COMMENTARY: A REPORT ON THE CHIROPRACTIC EDUCATION COLLOQUIUM

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Published Dec 16, 2016
Rosemary Giurato Michael Swain Benjamin Brown Aron Downie

Abstract

Background: This paper reports the proceedings of the 2014 chiropractic educational colloquium hosted by Macquarie University. Representatives from Australasian chiropractic educational institutions and major stakeholder groups in Australian chiropractic education came together to reflect on the collective professional effort.Objective: The aim of the colloquium was to: (1) report historical aspects of chiropractic legislation and education in Australia, (2) inform relevant stakeholders of current best practice in chiropractic education, and (3) advise academic leaders on models of best practice in education.Discussion: Presentations were provided by leading honorary life members, academics, regulators and industry advisors active in the Australian chiropractic profession. Two clear themes emerged: (1) that chiropractic educationalists play an important role in developing competencies of chiropractors and; chiropractic academics have an important responsibility to further the chiropractic profession’s research capacity to ensure chiropractic has a place in Australian universities.Conclusion: The colloquium provided an opportunity for Australian chiropractors to reflect on their progress in education to date and also identify the future direction of chiropractic education. Research activity remains a formative part of academic capacity building which leads to educational excellence. (Chiropr J Australia 2016;44:283-289)
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Keywords

Chiropractic, Education, Research, Leadership, Universities

References
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